Saturday, August 14, 2010

Wayne Higgins, director of the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center, sounds like a denier!

Chilly West, scorching East: There's a link - San Jose Mercury News
As Washington, D.C., prepared today to endure a 54th consecutive day of unusually high temperatures, some Bay Area cities were expecting low temperatures similar to those that, for example, gave Redwood City a record-cold July.

That same month, other Bay Area cities, such as Richmond, came close to breaking low-temperature records dating to 1960.

So, is there some factor linking the extreme weather on the two coasts?

"There definitely is," said Wayne Higgins, director of the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center in Camp Springs, Md., where he spoke during a power outage caused by severe thunderstorms.
...
As to whether other strange weather reported nationwide and around the world -- such as Pakistan's monsoons or a nearly two-pound hailstone found in July in South Dakota, the largest ever recovered in the United States -- are harbingers of lasting climate change, Higgins said there's simply not enough data to draw that conclusion.

"What we're looking at is climate variability, and in some cases it's pretty extreme," he said. "But I would not characterize it as climate change. It's never a good idea to look at one or even a few events and say something about change or trends."

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Tom Nelson crys wolf with no formal meteorological training whatsoever.